Gardening Does Not Have To Be Hard

Changing your lifestyle around and ensuring that your family always has healthy meals, means that you must make better food choices. Turning to organic produce is a great way in which you can make those healthy changes. For some great organic gardening tips that you can easily use, check out the information below.

If you want to have a more productive garden, expand your growing season into the fall by using row covers. Row covers keep heat in, frost out, and also protect against deer intrusion. The crops under the row covers should still be somewhat resistant to cold however, so it is best to choose greens and root vegetables.

Selecting bulbs. Most bulbs are sold during their dormant period. Buy them as early as possible before they start to produce roots. Most spring flowering bulbs will begin to grow roots by early fall, and by planting them early, you will ensure that they have time to establish themselves. Bulbs will deteriorate if kept out of the ground too long. Don’t buy any bulb that is soft or mushy, or appears to be diseased.

Plants need room to grow. Packing too many plants in proximity to one another will make them compete for resources and you’ll subsequently either have one plant die, or have both plants grow in much worse conditions. It’s advisable to research the full size of a plant and look at how deep and how far apart the plants should be grown.

To keep dirt from getting under your fingernails while gardening, reach for a bar of soap beforehand! As much as we all love gardening, none of us really enjoy all that soil that gets stuck under our nails that can be so challenging to remove. Simply claw a bar of soap before you begin working in your garden and when finished, run your hands under water and as the soap washes away, so does the dirt!

Look at your planting area before you purchase any rose bushes. Some varieties of roses can be finicky in the type of soil or planting environment that they need. On the other hand, there are other varieties that are hearty enough to tolerate a variety of conditions. So, when you know what type of growing environment your roses will live in, you can choose the most suitable variety.

Are you wondering if you need to water your lawn? One good way to tell is to simply walk across it. If you can see your footprints, you have a thirsty yard. Every week, your lawn should be receiving up to one inch of water. If you live in an area where it doesn’t rain frequently, make sure to give your lawn the “footprint test” whenever you’re not sure if it’s had enough to drink.

Did you know that a tablespoon of powdered milk sprinkled around your rose bushes early in the season can help to prevent fungus growth on your beautiful flowers later in the spring? If you prefer to use a spray, you might try diluting some skim milk and spraying the plant leaves. The lower fat content in skim milk reduces the chance that it will turn rancid.

If you find that your garden is producing more vegetables than you can eat, you might try finding recipes that call for the produce in different stages of maturity. For example, if you anticipate that you’ll have more squash than you need, you can harvest the squash blossoms. This makes your garden more diverse in its offerings that you can enjoy.

Evergreens are best planted at least four weeks before the ground freezes. This will allow the tree to establish some roots before the soil freezes in the late fall. Evergreens do not drop their leaves in the fall, but continue to lose moisture, so it is important to get them in the ground well before the first frost.

Try planting a ‘one-color’ garden bed. While this takes quite a bit of work, due to the limitations of the color palette, it can create a very striking visual. The emphasis is placed more on shape and structure, and it is especially helpful in a small garden, as it makes the area appear much larger. Remember that ‘one-color’ doesn’t mean a single shade. Use all shades in the color palette. For example a blue garden can feature flowers in shades of blue, purple and mauve.

If you do not like chemical insect repellants you should consider using herbs instead. Herbs like chives can be used in place of the chemical insect repellants to keep bugs from eating your flowers and produce. You can grow chives yourself or buy them at your local grocery store.

One of the best things about the tips you’ve read in the above article is that they’re all fairly simple to implement. You won’t have to attend Cornell in order to become a great organic gardener. As long as you can implement what you’ve learned here, your garden will be fantastic.

4 thoughts on “Gardening Does Not Have To Be Hard”

  1. Grow seasonings and kitchen herbs in your garden. Herbs are generally very simple to grow, and can even be made to thrive in a window box or indoor pot. However, these easy plants are very expensive to buy at the store. Growing them yourself can save you significant amounts of money.

  2. So you have finally decided you want to plant a garden. One of the first things you will want to do is to find out if you have good or bad soil. The only sure way you will know this is to have the soil tested. Many nurseries will test your soil for a nominal fee. Soil with poor health will produce yellow, sickly-looking plants. By having your soil tested, you will know if your soil needs nutrients added or if you need to make adjustments to the pH of the soil.

  3. Create a zen garden by adding a water feature. Water features come in all sizes and designs. it is possible to have a very small water feature that is suitable for a patio or a very large pond. Several manufacturers make kits do-it-yourself kits that can be installed in just a few hours.

  4. Before settling on your garden space, visit it at multiple times throughout the day. You need to understand what type of light the spot gets on an hourly basis, as it can have ramifications on the plants you can grow and your ability to grow anything at all! If the location receives no direct sunlight, reconsider your options.

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